Milton Jones stops in Croydon for comedy tour show. Now he talks about about life and career

Milton Jones is the winner of Perrier Best Newcomer Award, Sony Award and British Comedy Award. His comedy style is based on one-line punches delivered in an edgy style. Jones has had many shows on BBC Radio 4 and is a recurring guest panelist on “Mock the Week”.

He often tours across UK and now he is bringing his new show “On the Road” to Croydon on Nov 23 as part of another national tour.

In a www.Croydonguardian.com.uk interview, the comedian speaks about his life and career.

So you wanted to be an actor?

Yes, but no-one else wanted me to - well I didn’t have much work at the time. But the thing about stand-up is that if you have the bottle you can get up and do it if you want. So I gave it a try. My first few attempts weren’t great but I was arrogant enough to keep going. When it began to work I noticed that unlike acting, you didn’t have to rehearse or share the laughs with anyone else. But also unlike acting if it went wrong there was no-one else to blame.

So how did you end up doing one-liners?

I’ve always had a short concentration span. I think I appeal to other people who have short concentration spans. (Not that they will have read this far.) I think if a one-liner succeeds you put a tiny but entertaining cartoon in peoples’ heads.

What’s it like being on Mock the Week?

It’s a bit like doing a comedy exam in public. The hardest part is to get a word in when other people are talking. But next series I will be distracting people with my lucky klaxon.

You’ve been around a while now – how has the comedy scene changed during your career?

Stand-up is much bigger now, but also less risky and inventive than it used to be. When I started there was an act called the Iceman who brought a giant block of ice on stage and melted it with a blowtorch while shouting weak puns about ice. Okay, he’d be unlikely to sell out the O2 Arena but the circuit has lost some of its tin-pot charm. Also all the reality competitions mean audiences often see things in terms of ‘who won?’ rather than just enjoying the variety of a show.

What’s the best or the worst heckle you’ve ever had?

Once when I was on stage someone shouted ‘What is this?’. It was a philosophical heckle really. I didn’t know what to reply. It was too big a question for me to answer. In a way I’d like to have ended the show then and there. But we all carried on like idiot.

What else have you been up to this year?

I spent three weeks in New Zealand in the spring. It was excellent as it is a lovely place and its still 1995 over there, which meant I could do all my old jokes. I’ve also been doing a few panel games and trying to think of TV ideas. My diary this summer seems to be full of festivals. These days any town that can get hold of a marquee and microphone seems to have a comedy tent.

Any plans for the future?

After On the Road I would like to do more TV acting, have my own TV show and maybe be in a film. Then I would like to own a castle, a small city and so on until eventually I have an empire that stretches from West London to the outskirts of China. But to be honest it’s more likely to be the same round of radio, TV panel games and odd visits to arts centers.

Milton Jones is the winner of Perrier Best Newcomer Award, Sony Award and British Comedy Award. His comedy style is based on one-line punches delivered in an edgy style. Jones has had many shows on BBC Radio 4 and is a recurring guest panelist on “Mock the Week”.

He often tours across UK and now he is bringing his new show “On the Road” to Croydon on Nov 23 as part of another national tour.

In a www.Croydonguardian.com.uk interview, the comedian speaks about his life and career.

So you wanted to be an actor?

Yes, but no-one else wanted me to - well I didn’t have much work at the time. But the thing about stand-up is that if you have the bottle you can get up and do it if you want. So I gave it a try. My first few attempts weren’t great but I was arrogant enough to keep going. When it began to work I noticed that unlike acting, you didn’t have to rehearse or share the laughs with anyone else. But also unlike acting if it went wrong there was no-one else to blame.

So how did you end up doing one-liners?

I’ve always had a short concentration span. I think I appeal to other people who have short concentration spans. (Not that they will have read this far.) I think if a one-liner succeeds you put a tiny but entertaining cartoon in peoples’ heads.

What’s it like being on Mock the Week?

It’s a bit like doing a comedy exam in public. The hardest part is to get a word in when other people are talking. But next series I will be distracting people with my lucky klaxon.

You’ve been around a while now – how has the comedy scene changed during your career?

Stand-up is much bigger now, but also less risky and inventive than it used to be. When I started there was an act called the Iceman who brought a giant block of ice on stage and melted it with a blowtorch while shouting weak puns about ice. Okay, he’d be unlikely to sell out the O2 Arena but the circuit has lost some of its tin-pot charm. Also all the reality competitions mean audiences often see things in terms of ‘who won?’ rather than just enjoying the variety of a show.

What’s the best or the worst heckle you’ve ever had?

Once when I was on stage someone shouted ‘What is this?’. It was a philosophical heckle really. I didn’t know what to reply. It was too big a question for me to answer. In a way I’d like to have ended the show then and there. But we all carried on like idiot.

What else have you been up to this year?

I spent three weeks in New Zealand in the spring. It was excellent as it is a lovely place and its still 1995 over there, which meant I could do all my old jokes. I’ve also been doing a few panel games and trying to think of TV ideas. My diary this summer seems to be full of festivals. These days any town that can get hold of a marquee and microphone seems to have a comedy tent.

Any plans for the future?

After On the Road I would like to do more TV acting, have my own TV show and maybe be in a film. Then I would like to own a castle, a small city and so on until eventually I have an empire that stretches from West London to the outskirts of China. But to be honest it’s more likely to be the same round of radio, TV panel games and odd visits to arts centers.

Quick Info Milton Jones stops in Croydon for comedy tour show. Now he talks about about life and career

Related Stand-up comedy to: Milton Jones stops in Croydon for comedy tour show. Now he talks about about life and career

Be a pal and spread the word!

Fresh Stand-up Comedy Concert Videos

New Videos

We have 18 guests online
Copyright © 2008 - 2011. BestComedyOnline.net: The best Stand Up Comedy Videos